studies

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Psilocybin and other Psychedelic substances like LSD have actually the subject of academic research and study for almost 70 years, albeit with a 30 hiatus during the ill-fated "war on drugs". Doctors and Therapists have long been interested in the ability of these substances to elicit meaningful and transformative experiences with long lasting positive effects, and there were several studies which went on during the 1950s and 60s. While this early research showed immense promise for the use of psychedelics as a treatment, unfortunately the study of these substances was abruptly (and unjustifiably) halted in the early 1970's. It took until 1997 for the first post-drug-war Psilocybin study to be conducted by a team of researchers at the University of Zurich.

 

This study was conducted by a team of researchers led by Dr. Franz Vollenweider, and explored whether brain function under the influence of psilocybin was consistent with the brain function of chronic schizophrenia patients, finding that these brain states were significantly contrasted. They also found that psilocybin increased cerebral glucose metabolism (in layman's terms brain activity) in many areas, and had dampening effects on the ego-influenced Default Mode Network. This study catalyzed several others, at institutions in several nations such as John Hopkins University, The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), The Beckley Foundation, Yale, Stanford, Berkeley, New York University. This growing body of data has shown Psychedelics to be both safe & effective in treating a host of conditions. Some of these conditions include depression, addiction, anxiety, OCD, PTSD, and eating disorders.

 

In the decades since the turn of the century public attitude has also positively shifted towards the unfettered and open-minded research of psilocybin. Now, in 2020, governing bodies are beginning to follow suit. The FDA (Federal Drug Administration) has designated psilocybin a breakthrough therapy for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and Health Canada has granted several licenses to private and public companies in order to study psychedelics. Over a dozen accredited institutions, a few of which include Harvard, StanfordYaleThe Usona InstituteThe Heffter InstituteJohns Hopkins Universityand the University of Toronto are in the process of clinical trials/studies to determine the potential of psilocybin as a therapeutic aid, and there is a mountain of anecdotal evidence that cannot be discounted.

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Some of the claims made regarding Psychedelics capability to treat a variety of conditions on a long term basis, with low frequency of dosage, may seem exaggerated or outlandish. However they are backed by a body of credible research that is constantly expanding. 

 

We have curated a collection of the most relevant studies specific to Psychedelics below.

 

Psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression: fMRI-measured brain mechanisms
Psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression: fMRI-measured brain mechanisms

Robin L Carhart-Harris, Leor Roseman, Mark Bolstridge, Lysia Demetriou, J Nienke Pannekoek, Matthew B Wall, Mark Tanner, Mendel Kaelen, John McGonigle, Kevin Murphy, Robert Leech, H Valerie Curran, David J Nutt

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Psilocybin can occasion mystical-type experiences having substantial and sustained personal meaning
Psilocybin can occasion mystical-type experiences having substantial and sustained personal meaning

R. R. Griffiths, W. A. Richards, U. McCann & R. Jesse

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Enzymatic Synthesis of Psilocybin
Enzymatic Synthesis of Psilocybin

Janis Fricke, Felix Blei, Dirk Hoffmeister

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Potential Therapeutic Effects of Psilocybin
Potential Therapeutic Effects of Psilocybin

Matthew W. Johnson, Roland R. Griffiths

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Psilocybin - Summary of Knowledge and New Perspectives
Psilocybin - Summary of Knowledge and New Perspectives

Filip Tylš, Tomáš Páleníček, Jiří Horáček

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Neural correlates of ego‐dissolution under psilocybin
Neural correlates of ego‐dissolution under psilocybin

Alexander V. Lebedev, Martin Lövdén, Gidon Rosenthal, Amanda Feilding, David J. Nutt, Robin L. Carhart‐Harris

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Psilocybin: Psychotherapy or drug?
Psilocybin: Psychotherapy or drug?

Guy M. Goodwin

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Prediction of Psilocybin Response...
Prediction of Psilocybin Response...

Erich Studerus, Alex Gamma, Michael Kometer, Franz X. Vollenweider

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Psilocybin with psychological support for treatment-resistant depression
Psilocybin with psychological support for treatment-resistant depression

R. L. Carhart-Harris, M. Bolstridge, C. M. J. Day, J. Rucker, R. Watts, D. E. Erritzoe, M. Kaelen, B. Giribaldi, M. Bloomfield, S. Pilling, J. A. Rickard, B. Forbes, A. Feilding, D. Taylor, H. V. Curran & D. J. Nutt

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Neural correlates of the psychedelic state as determined by fMRI studies with psilocybin
Neural correlates of the psychedelic state as determined by fMRI studies with psilocybin

Robin L. Carhart-Harris, David Erritzoe, Tim Williams, James M. Stone, Laurence J. Reed, Alessandro Colasanti, Robin J. Tyacke, Robert Leech, Andrea L. Malizia, Kevin Murphy, Peter Hobden, John Evans, Amanda Feilding, Richard G. Wise, and David J. Nutt

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Acute psychological and physiological effects of psilocybin
Acute psychological and physiological effects of psilocybin

Felix Hasler, Ulrike Grimberg, Marco A Benz, Theo Huber, Franz X Vollenweider

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Activation of Serotonin 2A Receptors Underlies the Psilocybin-Induced Effects
Activation of Serotonin 2A Receptors Underlies the Psilocybin-Induced Effects

Michael Kometer, André Schmidt, Lutz Jäncke, and Franz X. Vollenweider

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